Lost Tapes The Bauman Incident

The Bauman Incident
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The Bauman story comes from President Theodore Roosevelt's 1892 book, The Wilderness Hunter, which describes an encounter between an ape-man and a young frontiersman named Bauman. According to Roosevelt, Bauman and his partner were trapping along a remote stretch of Montana's Wisdom River sometime in the mid-19th century. After building a lean-to and making camp in what seemed like an ideal spot for game, the two men began setting their traps. When they returned, they found their packs had been rummaged and their shanty torn down. Undaunted, the men set about reconstructing their wilderness abode.

According to Roosevelt's book, that night Bauman was awakened by the sound of rustling and the foul stench of a wild beast. He immediately rose up and fired a shot, and then heard something tearing off through the woods. He and his partner were unnerved by this and decided to abandon the camp at the first light of dawn.

Come morning, the two split up so that Bauman could gather the traps while his partner made camp downriver. Sadly, both would not make it home alive. When Bauman arrived at the new campsite, he found his partner sprawled on the ground with his necked snapped and a set of bite marks on his throat. He knew at once that the menacing forest beast was responsible, according to the story. The horrific sight sent him running — rifle in hand — never to return to the spot again. By the time he told his story to Roosevelt, Bauman was a very old man.

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